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I'm writing a story without the use of a tradition MC


Horu
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Allow me to explain the motive. The idea of a MC is that the story is about them. I will have MCs but the idea is that they are just there and the world doesn't revolve around them. So while being in the process of writing one character's origin, I can bounce to events that are taking place (Like Krypton exploding at the same time Thomas and Martha are shot). This allows for material that may seem like filler but can be very important information later. I mean, it allows for more interesting storylines and development of characters.

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So every story has some sort of unobtainium, my version of that will be introduced when the time is right.

Each character will have a limit of 5 powers/abilities. 5 is enough. Characters will only be able to do what is within their natural ability.

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As a whole this is not necessarily unique, but I guess it depends on what kind of genre you're going for.

My brother and I have an ongoing story of our own universe and while he likes to keep things structured with specific MC's, I like to jump from character to character and event to event.  It gives the sense that the world doesn't revolve around specific characters and it gives "listeners" the ability to justifiably relate to any character.

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  • 8 months later...

I once read a "book" with about 20 short stories of a "haunted" neighborhood. The story was tied together only at the very end.

To be honest I didn't really like it and I don't know why I read all the way through. I do like the idea of just tracking major events over many different characters though.

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The idea is moreso like what Tinkerer mentioned. Essentially jumping from character to character within a structured universe and the path of the characters will cross.

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That is what I'm saying also. I didn't explain well, but in the story the ~17/20 victims came to learn why their misfortune was happening. I believe over half the cast ended up not surviving. I think I would appreciate the theme of your story even more though.

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My story pretty much starts out in a distopia where the gods aren't really portrayed as good. They are pretty much there to eliminate all life and take their world back. Hence, there are a select few that can even dream of standing against them.

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i haven't tried writing a story with multiple MCs for a while (the last time fell apart fast) but it doesn't mean it can't be done, just that i'm not good at it. but here is something for thought, i guess?

on my own thread on my own story, Rayfield brought up One Hunded Days of Solitude (which i didn't know anything about, or even recgonize without the english name) where the story tracks a family over generations (also, Inheritors can be considered a more modern example). if the story takes place across a shorter span of time, another thing i think could be useful is crosscutting between each of the characters (for example, how ATLA switches between Aang's team and Zuko's throughout most episodes, at least until halfway through season 3). the generations method would give the sense of change throughout long periods of time, while the crosscut method can give the feeling of simultaneity as well as getting to know each character fairly well. but i'm not sure what you have in mind, just let me know.

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I do like this idea. The crosscutting implies that said events are taking place at the same time. Also the generational inheritance thing is also quite nice. It explains a lot of how a younger character could be borderline god when their ancestors could barely manage to kill a rabbit.

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I really don't get what you're trying to attempt here. It seems almost fruitless to attempt a story with a theoretical approach, instead of just writing a story in which you are pursuing the content instead of the context. Multiple stories have been appropriate for many different forms, and this is not much different than already established contexts. What is the point of having the Gods not portrayed as good? They are never portrayed as good in folklore and retellings, because a big contention for human-like characters is opposing forces. There is nothing bigger than a God, in most retrospects, and the character has to prove himself against it.

So, really, my concern is: Why are you approaching this story from some theoretical or contextual shape? It seems meaningless to set up the rules and regulations of your story and world without really situating the story itself, and just writing it out. The biggest problem that comes from these ideas is that they are fruitless if not mapped out. In general, this is not mapping out the story, only an entry into writing the story. That entry is not going to go anywhere, it never does. Might I recommend something different, that really sets into stone what you might be attempting otherwise.

Here is some advice to approaching the story. Stop caring about the elements of the world of the story. That is going to matter at the start, until you actually know the content and form that the story is going to take on. At the start, you have some sort of conflict, which is great, and some idea of what that conflict is, but that hardly is of concern until you put into motivation for the character(s).

This is the advice I have for teaching creative writing, in the focus of writing out a whole story: (Normally, this comes into three parts, but I want to focus on the first part of character building and world building).

The characters are should be where you should start, when it comes to writing more fantastical or epic based work, because this is what refines the world around. Now, if you're going to work with one character, it is best to construct an idea of recognition. The character should have motivation or curiosity before anything else, then everything work around that idea. If you are working on a group or multiple character dynamic, they all need to be flushed out in the same vain, with enough differences to really confer with each other as the narrative pushes the characters closer together.

So, what I want you to focus on first is establishing what the characters are, who they are. You can give them a name, give them an identity, a role, or something. But you should only focus on identifying what their motivation or curiosity is and the reason as to why this exists. Look at Yugi from Yu-Gi-Oh!, he had no motivation until Atem was revealed. He wished for friends, but that had come once Atem was the character. Instead, Atem was a device for the reader to recognize this curiosity and motivation. Yugi's role was situated at the introduction of Atem, where the absence of a past notes the prospect of the story. Because of that, the two characters shared a similar focus with two different ideas. Atem wanted to learn about his past and figure out his role in it, while Yugi was there to help him. Because of their connection, the motivation turned into growth.

This is going to be central to your writing. Everything else, that you have now, is good to have in the back of your mind, but you're going to drop the story once you start writing. Once you are here, we can start talking about more with the story and writing, but you're not at the point where we can look at the actually story, narrative, and conflict, until you have this content present. For other genres, there are certainly other approaches.

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I really appreciate your input on the subject matter, Dae.

The idea behind the gods not being portrayed as "good" isn't really a device for the human characters to "prove themselves" though. Essentially, the gods are there to do what gods do and humans are ultimately worthless to them at this point. As for the few that can even dream of standing against the gods, the gods see them as false symbols of hope or wannabe saviors that need to put down like rabid dogs. Ultimately, I intended on dedicating a chapter to each year of the story since said event had taken place. But yeah, ultimately, the traditional hero is dead or no one believes they still exist.

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